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Monday, November 05, 2007

Am I hard?

Now this is a question I don't really ask myself. I'm big, strong, fast, competent and confident.

Which is the most important? Without much doubt, the confidence. I don't get people starting on me, I don't get people taking the piss out of me and I don't get many people not listening to me. I don't get much bother. When shit does happen I get stuck in, but don't lose my head. If you're not fighting, me or someone, else I'll not take my frustration out on you. If I fly in and it's all over in two seconds, I'll come off the boil fast and not be in a hurry to use your head to open the fire doors. This all means I don't get much bother.

This however doesn't reflect well with my bosses, I can get through nights where people don't need more than a word here or there to get them through to the end of the night. I don't end up having massive brawls with large groups of punters. I just get the job done as quickly and simply as possible. This means I don't stand out but the job gets done all the same.

Am I hard? Don't try to find out and you'll never need to know.

2 comments:

Bill Sticker said...

Confidence is better than hard. With confidence you can blag it and not have to resort to finding out how hard you are. It got me out of enough tight spots.

Adoor Man,

I get regular traffic off your blog and want to ask a favour. Merys Jones over at http://bloodystudents.blogspot.com is facing a major career glitch. If she can't raise a grand inside two weeks she gets her funding pulled. I'm e-mailing everyone I know to ask if they can help her. Visit her blog and make a donation if you can. Doesn't have to be much, a pound will help. All donations via PayPal will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance.

Regards

Bill

non-chav nightclub attendee said...

Check out Peel's 9 Principles of Policing (Google it). Most of them could probably be applied to the role of the doorman, but the final one is particularly relevant to the post:

9. The test of police [a doorman's?] efficiency is the absence of crime and disorder, not the visible evidence of police [a doorman's?] action in dealing with it.